'Landet av Isbjørn' literally meaning 'the land of the ice bear' is the name often used for the islands of Svalbard

In the heart of the Arctic Ocean, at 76-81 degrees North, the Svalbard Archipelago remains one of the worlds last great 'firsts'. Despite numerous attempts, no one has ever paddled around all four main islands. Now, after 6 years of dreaming and planning to complete this epic trip, we are setting off to do just that. This will be our adventure amongst ice bears and Islands.




Meet the Team

We have a great assembly of strong people to achieve this trip.
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Previous Attempts at Svalbard

Here is a short video detailing the tribulations the last team that tried this expedition had to go through. This trip is no joke.

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Svalbard Photos Week 3

Image 1 Now we face more regular glacial fronts and less places to land. Image 2 Tara takes photos of the murres above on the cliffs while some others sneak past behind her Zegul Arrow Empower. Image 3 Our zegul arrow empowers under sail as we move back up the hinlopenstretet after relocating out food drop {CAPTION} {CAPTION} {CAPTION}
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The Sailing of the Kayaks and the Return to 80 Degrees North

Ocean swell rolls by, stormy with frothy tops, as the wind almost howls and with a flurry of wings hundreds of Murres erupt from the water in front of our bows. Like flying penguins these black and white birds launch into the sky or dive below the surface as we come driving forwards, often mere centimetres from them when they choose to evade up or down. The sky is filled with them and often they c
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The Sailing of the Kayaks and the Return to 80 Degrees North

  Ocean swell rolls by, stormy with frothy tops; with a flurry of wings, hundreds of Murres erupt from the water in front of our bows. Like flying penguins these black and white birds launch into the sky or dive below the surface as we come driving forwards, often mere centimeters from them when they choose to evade up or down. The sky is filled with them and often they choose to fly in close
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